Druckansicht der Internetadresse:

FACULTY OF LAW, BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

Chair of International Macroeconomics and Trade – Prof. Dr. Hartmut Egger

Print page

Past Courses

Lectures

​Advanced (International) Macroeconomics (+ Excercise)Hide

Lecture

Vorlesung, SWS:2, VL Number: 33520

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger 

Description

It is the main purpose of this course to make students at the diploma or master level familiar with formal concepts of advanced macroeconomics in open economies. While the course has a strong analytical focus, the content – which includes aspects of international trade as well as monetary economics – is relevant for many fields in economics and finance.

The course is taught in English. Also the exam will be posed in English.

Table of Contents

  • Intertemporal Trade and Current Account (O&R[1,2])
  • Purchasing Power Parity, Real Exchange Rate and the Balassa-Samuelson Effect (O&R[4])
  • Financial Markets, Nominal Interest Rates and Balance of Payments (R[1])Money and Exchange Rates (O&R[8,9])

Supporting Material

Lecture Notes for this course can be downloaded from the E-Learning server.

Recommended Textbooks

  • Obstfeld, Maurice and Kenneth Rogoff (1996), Foundations of International Macroeconomics, Cambridge/M.: MIT Press.
  • Rødseth, Asbjørn (2000), Open Economy Macroeconomics, Cambridge/UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Gandolfo, Giancarlo (2001), International Finance and Open-Economy Macroeconomics, Berlin et al.: Springer.
  • Harms, Philipp (2008), Internationale Makroökonomik, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck.

Exercise Course

An exercise course will support students in handling the different modeling approaches. It is strongly recommended to attend this exercise course in order to pass the exam.

Grading

Grading of the course is based on active participation and a written exam (1h) at the end of the term. If the number of participating students is less than 5, an oral examination may replace the written one. (Students will be informed about the form of examination as soon as possible.)


Excercise

Vorlesung, SWS:2, VL Number: 33520

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger 

Description

It is the main purpose of this course to make students at the diploma or master level familiar with formal concepts of advanced macroeconomics in open economies. While the course has a strong analytical focus, the content – which includes aspects of international trade as well as monetary economics – is relevant for many fields in economics and finance.

The course is taught in English. Also the exam will be posed in English.

Table of Contents

  • 88Intertemporal Trade and Current Account (O&R[1,2])
  • Purchasing Power Parity, Real Exchange Rate and the Balassa-Samuelson Effect (O&R[4])
  • Financial Markets, Nominal Interest Rates and Balance of Payments (R[1])
  • Money and Exchange Rates (O&R[8,9])

Supporting Material

Lecture Notes for this course can be downloaded from the E-Learning server.

Recommended Textbooks

  • Obstfeld, Maurice and Kenneth Rogoff (1996), Foundations of International Macroeconomics, Cambridge/M.: MIT Press.
  • Rødseth, Asbjørn (2000), Open Economy Macroeconomics, Cambridge/UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Gandolfo, Giancarlo (2001), International Finance and Open-Economy Macroeconomics, Berlin et al.: Springer.
  • Harms, Philipp (2008), Internationale Makroökonomik, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck.

Exercise Course

An exercise course will support students in handling the different modeling approaches. It is strongly recommended to attend this exercise course in order to pass the exam.

Grading

Grading of the course is based on active participation and a written exam (1h) at the end of the term. If the number of participating students is less than 5, an oral examination may replace the written one. (Students will be informed about the form of examination as soon as possible.)

Advanced Trade TheoryHide

Lecture

Vorlesung, SWS:2, VL Number: 33540

Lecturer

Michael Koch 

Description

It is the main purpose of this course to make students at the master level familiar with models in the traditional and new trade theory with a strong analytical focus. In the first part the course provides a rigorous analysis of the theoretical microeconomic concepts required for developing trade theory. These concepts include factor endowments, production functions and production frontiers, returns to scale on the supply side, and utility and preference aggregation on the demand side. From these models we develop the notion of general equilibrium with and without trade, which allows considering aspects of the gains from trade and how they are distributed. In part 2 we go on to develop specific theories of why countries trade with one another by considering first the major traditional theories, including relative differences in labor productivity, the interaction of factor endowments and production functions, and short-run factor specificity.  Part 3 will introduce models from the new trade theory, including oligopolistic and monopolistic competition. Part 4 will give an introduction to the “new new” trade theory by discussing the Melitz (2003) framework.

The course is taught in English. Also the exam will be posed in English.

Table of Contents


Part 1: A two-sector model of trade

  • The 2x2 production model
  • Preferences and aggregate demand
  • General equilibrium
  • Trade in a two country model
  • Gains from trade

Part 2: Traditional trade theories

  • Ricardo-Model
  • Heckscher-Ohlin-Model
  • Ricardo-Viner-Model

Part 3: New trade theory

  • Oligopolistic Competition
  • Monopolistic Competition (homogenous firms)

Part 4: New New trade theory

  • Monopolistic Competition (heterogeneous firms)

Supporting Material

Lecture Notes for this course can be downloaded from the E-Learning server.

Recommended Textbooks

  • Markusen, J.R., Melvin, J.R., Kaempfer, W.H., Maskus, K. E. (1995), International Trade, McGraw-Hill International Editions. http://spot.colorado.edu/~markusen/textbook.html 

  • van Marrewijk, C. (2007), International Economics: Theory, Application, and Policy, Oxford University Press.

  • Feenstra, R.C. (2016), Advanced International Trade: Theory and Evidence, 2nd Edition, Princeton University Press.

  • Recommended Articles

  • Brander, J. and P. Krugman (1983) A ‘reciprocal dumping’ model of international trade, Journal of International Economics 15, 313-321.

  • Krugman, P. (1980) Scale economies, product differentiation and the pattern of trade, American Economic Review 70, 950-959.

  • Melitz, M. (2003) The impact of trade on intra-industry reallocations and aggregate industry productivity, Econometrica 71, 1695-1726.

  • Eaton, J., and Kortum, S. (2002). Technology, Geography, and Trade. Econometrica, 70(5), 1741-1779.

Exercise Course

An exercise course will support students in handling the different modeling approaches. It is strongly recommended to attend this exercise course in order to pass the exam.

Grading

Grading of the course is based on active participation and a written exam (1h) at the end of the term. If the number of participating students is less than 5, an oral examination may replace the written one. (Students will be informed about the form of examination as soon as possible.)
Registration (and deregistration) for the final exam takes place via the Campus Online system. Campus Online also provides information on current registration periods, time and place of exams.


Exercise

Übung, SWS:1, VL Number: 33541

Lecturer

Michael Koch 

Description

The exercise course is closely linked to the lecture and supports the students in handling the different modeling approaches. The corresponding exercises will be provided on the e-learning server of the University of Bayreuth. It might be useful to prepare the exercises in advance to the course. It is strongly recommended to attend this course as well as the lecture for passing the exam successfully.

Please note there is no strict cutoff between the lecture and exercise course with respect to the time. Especially in the first weeks I will give a lecture in the afternoon. I will announce in class when we will discuss the respective problem set (usually after we have finished a chapter from the lecture course).

​Arbeitsmarkt und Beschäftigung (+ Exercise)Hide

Vorlesung, SWS:2+2, 

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger ; Matthias Kollenda

Content

Im Mittelpunkt der Vorlesung Arbeitsmarkt und Beschäftigung stehen Modelle zur Erklärung von unfreiwilliger Arbeitslosigkeit. Daneben werden auch empirische Befunde zum deutschen Arbeitsmarkt präsentiert. Einen weiteren wichtigen Aspekt der Vorlesung bilden die institutionellen Regelungen des deutschen Arbeitsmarktes, die im Rahmen der Veranstaltung beschrieben und kritisch diskutiert werden.

Lerninhalte und Adressatenkreis

Die Lehrveranstaltung richtet sich an interessierte Studierende, mit guten mikroökonomischen Vorkenntnissen. Im Rahmen der Vorlesung werden neben einer Darstellung des neoklassischen Grundmodells verschiedene Ansätze zur Begründung unfreiwilliger Arbeitslosigkeit formal analysiert und die wesentlichen Aussagen der Modelle auch vor dem Hintergrund empirischer Einsichten kritisch diskutiert. Die Veranstaltung eröffnet den Studierenden Einblicke in die wesentlichen Erkenntnisse der Arbeitsmarkttheorie und der spezifischen Regelungen des deutschen Arbeitsmarktes.

Gliederung

Teil I: Zahlen und Fakten

  • Empirische Aspekte des Arbeitsmarktes

Teil II: Neoklassische Arbeitsmarkttheorie

  • Das Arbeitsangebot
  • Die Arbeitsnachfrage
  • Gleichgewicht am Arbeitsmarkt

Teil III: Modelle zur Erklärung unfreiwilliger Arbeitslosigkeit

  • Friktionen (Search und Matching)
  • Effizienzlöhne
  • Gewerkschaften

Teil IV: Arbeitsmarktinstitutionen

  • Staatliche Arbeitsmarktdienstleistungen
  • Kündigungsschutz

Literatur

Die Vorlesung basiert insbesondere auf folgenden Büchern:

  • Wagner, T. Jahn, E.J. (2004), Neue Arbeitsmarkttheorien 2. Auflage, Lucius & Lucius Stuttgart.
  • Franz, W. (2009), Arbeitsmarktökonomik 7. Auflage, Springer Berlin.
  • Weiterführende Literatur
  • Booth, A. (2002), The Economics of the Trade Union, Cambridge University Press.
  • Cahuc, P., Zylberberg, A. (2004), Labor Economics, MIT Press.

Hinweise zur Übung

Die Übung zur Vorlesung Arbeitsmarkt und Beschäftigung ist eng mit der Vorlesung abgestimmt und dient zur Vertiefung des Vorlesungsstoffes. Im Rahmen der Übung werden Aufgaben gerechnet. Die entsprechenden Aufgabenblätter werden am E-Learning Server der Universität Bayreuth bereitgestellt.

Den Studierenden wird dringend empfohlen, sich sorgfältig auf Vorlesung und Übung vorzubereiten, damit sie den Ausführungen des jeweils Vortragenden folgen und Fragen zum Lehrveranstaltungsinhalt stellen können. Für ein erfolgreiches Bestehen der Prüfung wird sowohl die Teilnahme an der Vorlesung als auch die Teilnahme an der Übung empfohlen.

Hinweise zum Ablauf und den Terminen finden sich auf dem ELearning Server.

Klausur

Die Anmeldung erfolgt über CampusOnline.

​Firms in International Markets - IWB III (+ Exercise)Hide

Vorlesung, SWS:2+1

 
Lecturer 

Hartmut Egger

Content

The recent international economics literature puts particular emphasis on the role of firms in international markets. On the one hand, imperfect competition and the preference of consumers to purchase goods from different firms are broadly accepted to be important aspects for understanding the empirical observation that most of the trade flows are in the form of two-way exchanges (i) within narrow industry classifications and (ii) between relatively similar countries. This is in sharp contrast to predictions of the traditional trade theory. On the other hand, firm organization itself is important for understanding the international transaction patterns. In particular, the international fragmentation of production processes and the organization of firms across national borders seem to be important aspects that render the recent wave of globalization different from previous ones.

It is the purpose of the lecture “Firms in International Markets” to shed light on these two phenomena. Thereby, the focus lies on the discussion of workhorse models for analyzing these aspects. Beyond that, some empirical evidence is presented in order to emphasize the relevance of the aforementioned phenomena.

Both the course and the exam will be in English.

Exercise Course

The exercise course is closely linked to the lecture and supports the students in handling the different modeling approaches. The corresponding exercises will be provided on the e-learning server of the University of Bayreuth. It might be useful to prepare exercises in advance to the course. It is strongly recommended to attend this course as well as the lecture for passing the exam successfully.

The course will be in English and will take place weekly.

Grading

Grading of the course is based on active participation and a written exam (1h) at the end of the term. If the number of participating students is less than 5, an oral examination may replace the written one. (Students will be informed about the form of examination as soon as possible.)

​Growth Theory (+ Exercise)Hide

Lecture

Vorlesung, SWS:2, VL Number: 34003

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger 

Course Description

This course provides an introduction into the theory of economic growth. The question of whether economies can grow perpetually and to what extent resources generated in the growth process suffice to guarantee the survival of the population have been key challenges for economic research since economics has evolved as an independent academic discipline. In this lecture, we look at key topics that are put forward in the literature and shed light on the engines of economic growth as well as the consequences of technology diffusion in open economies. The lecture also introduces the techniques required to study models of economic growth, which usually involve the problem of dynamic optimization.  

The course is taught in English. Also the exam will be posed in English.

Click here to enroll for the e-learning course.

Table of Contents

Part A: Models of exogenous growth

  • The Solow growth model (A[2])
  • The neoclassical growth model (A[8])
  • Overlapping generations (A[9])

Part B: Models of endogenous growth

  • First Generation Models of Endogenous Growth (A[11])
  • The expanding variety model (A[13])
  • A model of Schumpeterian Growth (BSM[7])
  • Technology Diffusion (A[18], BSM[8])

Recommended Textbooks

  • Acemoglu, Daron (2009): Introduction to Modern Economic Growth. Princeton University Press. (A)
  • Barro, Robert J. and Sala-i-Martin, Xavier (2004): Economic Growth. 2nd Edition, MIT Press. (BSM)

Grading

Grading of the course is based on active participation and a written exam (1h) at the end of the term. If the number of participating students is less than 5, an oral examination may replace the written one. (Students will be informed about the form of examination as soon as possible.) 
Registration (and deregistration) for the final exam takes place via the CampusOnline system. CampusOnline also provides information on current registration periods, time and place of exams.

Organization

Lect 2h, Mon 2-4 p.m., room S68 and Tue 2-4 p.m., room S65

Since we meet 4 hours each week, the course will end in May (after the first half of the summer term).

The first lecture takes place on Tuesday, 10th of April, 2-4 p.m., room S65. Please note, that there will be a one-time-only lecture on Tuesday, 10th of April, 4-6 p.m., room S65.

 


Exercise

Übung, SWS:1, VL Number: 34004

Lecturer

Simone Habermeyer 

Course Outline

The exercise course is closely linked to the lecture and supports the students in handling the different modeling approaches. The corresponding exercises will be provided on the e-learning server of the University of Bayreuth. It might be useful to prepare the exercises in advance to the course. It is strongly recommended to attend this course as well as the lecture for passing the exam successfully.

The course will be in English and will take place weekly.

Click here to enroll for the e-learning course.

Organization

  • Ex 2h, Mon 6-8 p.m., room S62 and Tue 6-8 p.m., room S64
  • Since we meet 4 hours each week, the course will end in May (after the first half of the summer term).

The first exercise class takes place on Monday, 16th of April.

 

​International Labor Markets Hide


Vorlesung, SWS:3, VL Number: 34237

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger 

Description

This course addresses the labor market consequences of international market integration. This topic has not only sparked considerable interest in academic research but is also of highest policy relevance and controversially debated in the general public.

In the course, we will discuss key contributions to the literature on labor markets in open economies, including early studies in models of the traditional trade theory as well as more recent approaches relying on models of the new trade theory. The main purpose is making students familiar with techniques of modeling labor market imperfections in models of the trade theory to answer key policy questions. Thereby, the course deviates from a typical lecture/exercise style and does not rely on just a single textbook. Rather, we will work with original articles in class and will go through the analysis step by step. Students then have the opportunity to apply their skills acquired during the lectures by writing a short thesis on a specific topic of international labor markets.

Literature

There is not a textbook out there, containing all the material studied in this course. However, some useful references are given below.

Part 1: Labor Market Imperfections in the traditional trade literature

  • Markusen, J.R., Melvin, J.R., Kaempfer, W.H., Maskus, K. E. (1995), International Trade, McGraw-Hill International Editions, Chapters 2-5. http://spot.colorado.edu/~markusen/textbook.html (for the refresher of traditional trade theory)
  • Brecher, R. (1974), Minimum Wage Rates and the Pure Theory of International Trade, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol. 88, pp. 98-116.
  • Davis, D. (1998), Does European Unemployment Prop Up American Wages?, American Economic Review, Vol. 88, pp. 478-494.
  • Kreickemeier, U. and D. Nelson (2006), Fair Wages, Unemployment and Technological Change in a Global Economy, Journal of International Economics, Vol. 70, 451-469.
  • Kreickemeier, U. (2008), Unemployment in Models of International Trade, in: David Greenaway, Richard Upward and Peter Wright (eds.): Globalisation and Labour Market Adjustment, Palgrave Macmillan, 73–96.

Part 2: Labor Market Imperfections in the New Trade Theory

  • Markusen, J.R., Melvin, J.R., Kaempfer, W.H., Maskus, K. E. (1995), International Trade, McGraw-Hill International Editions, Chapter 12. http://spot.colorado.edu/~markusen/textbook.html (for the Krugman model)
  • Krugman, P.R. (1980), Scale Economies, Product Differentiation, and the Pattern of Trade, American Economic Review, Vol. 70, pp. 950-959.
  • Ethier, W.J. (1982), National and International Returns to Scale in the Modern Theory of International Trade, American Economic Review, Vol. 72, pp. 389-405.
  • Melitz, M.J. (2003), The Impact of Trade on Intra-Industry Reallocations and Aggregate Industry Productivity, Econometrica, Vol. 71, pp. 1695-1725.
  • Egger, H., P. Egger, P., and J.R. Markusen (2012), International Welfare and Employment Linkages Arising from Minimum Wages, International Economic Review, Vol. 53, pp. 771-790.
  • Egger, H. and U. Kreickemeier (2009), Firm Heterogeneity and the Labour Market Effects of Trade Liberalisation International Economic Review, Vol. 50, pp. 187-216.
  • Egger, H. and U. Kreickemeier (2010), Worker-Specific Effects of Globalisation, World Economy, Vol. 33, pp. 987-1005.

Part 3: Entrepreneuers, Workers and Offshoring

  • Egger, H. and U. Kreickemeier (2012), Fairness, Trade, and Inequality, Journal of International Economics, Vol. 86, pp. 184-196.
  • Egger, H., U. Kreickemeier, and J. Wrona (2013), Offshoring Domestic Jobs, CESifo Working Paper No. 4083, 2013.
​International Migration Hide

Description

Migration is a policy issue of first-rate importance. Not surprisingly, migration has been a very active area of research for economists. Furthermore, migration is a topic where labor economics and international economics come together. This course seeks to apply the tools of economic theory and econometrics to understand a number of key elements of international migration: foundations of the individual decision to migrate and the choice of country of immigration; the factors affecting economic performance of migrants in host countries; factors underlying aggregate patterns of migration; the aggregate consequences of migration for host country economies (e.g. wages, unemployment, growth); the effects of policy on migration flows; the political economy of immigration policy; and normative (i.e. welfare) implications of migration on host and home countries. Given the centrality of this issue, most other fields in the social and behavioral sciences also work in this area–especially demography, sociology and political science–and, while we will occasionally draw on work from these areas when they bear directly on our economic analysis, our focus will be the economic analysis of migration.

Prerequisites

The course is designed as an advanced Bachelor course. Students who are interested in the course should have acquired credit points in the introductory macroeconomics and microeconomics and empirical economic research courses. Some knowledge of international and labor economics would be an advantage.

Organization

The course will be blocked in summer term 2013 and the (four hour) sessions are on the following dates: Fr. 31.05. 08-12h, Th. 06.06 16-20h, Fr. 07.06. 08-12h, Th. 13.06. 16-20h, Fr. 14.06. 08-12h; Th. 20.06. 16-20h; Fr. 21.06. 08-12h;

Credit points

For this course, 5 credit points can be acquired in the...

  • Economics Bachelor Program for the Specialization Modules: SVWL I, SVWL II and IS. More specifically, the course can be selected as a Module in “Public Management and Governance“ (as a substitute for “Arbeitsmarkt und Beschäftigung”), “Geld und Internationale Wirtschaft“ (as a substitute for IWB III), “Institutionen, Markt und Entwicklung““ (as a substitute for “Arbeitsmarkt und Beschäftigung”);
  • IWE Bachelor Program for the Specialization Module Areas PM (Public Management, as a substitute for “Arbeitsmarkt und Beschäftigung”), IGME (“Institutionen, Governance, Markt und Entwicklung”, as a substitute for IWB III), IS (“individueller Schwerpunkt”);
  • P&E Bachelor Program for the Area Ö6.

For this course 2/8 credit points can be acquired in the...

  • P&E Bachelor Program for Module Area V: Integration of Philosophy and Economics.

For this course 6 credit points can be acquired in the...

  •  (new) P&E Master Program for Module Area Electives.

Grading

Grading will be based on active participation in class and a written exam (probably at the end of June). This is an obligation for all participating students, irrespective of whether 2, 5, 6 or 8 CPs are acquired. In addition, students who would like to acquire more than 5 credit points must hand in a short research paper (about 10-12 pages) until 19 July 2013. Late papers will not be accepted!

Some good advice (at no extra charge)

First, keep current with the reading. Second, ask questions in class. If you read something and it is unclear and then it is unclear during lecture, ask about it. Your classmates will probably thank you. This is one of the few ways, before an exam, that I can gauge how the material is getting across. However, third, avoid questions that can be rendered into the form “are you wasting my time with this material” (e.g. “will this be on the exam”). Fourth, come see me during my office hours. This is another opportunity to get clarification and help on material about which you are unclear. But don't wait until the last minute, by then it is usually too late.

Brief outline

  • Microeconomics of Migration
  • Immigration Performance in the Host Country
  • Macroeconomics of Migration
  • Welfare Economics of Migration
  • Policy
  • Political Economy

Readings

  • Örn B. Bodvarsson and Hendrik Van den Berg (2009). The Economics of Immigration: Theory and Policy. Berlin: Springer.

Many articles and papers (which will be listed at the E-Learning page for this course).

​Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen I  (Internationaler Handel)  + ExerciseHide

Lecture

Vorlesung, SWS:2, VL Number: 34020

Lecturer

Michael Koch  

Description

Recent growth in economic integration has brought international trade issues to the forefront of both economics and society. This course is designed as an introduction into the economics of international trade and factor mobility. It provides an overview over the most important forms of internationalization and discusses their economic consequences. You will learn why countries may benefit from participating in the international division of labor through international trade based on comparative advantage or specialization gains. You will also develop an understanding why these gains from trade are unevenly distributed between different parts of society, say workers and capital owners or entrepreneurs, and why some people may indeed loose from globalization, while others gain. The course will offer alternative explanations for the pattern of trade, including traditional theories of comparative advantage as well as modern theories that focus on increasing returns to scale and imperfect competition. A further important goal is to understand the workings of international trade policy through tariffs and non-tariff barriers. The course will explain the effects of such policies on aggregate welfare of countries, as well as on the well-being of different individuals, like workers and capital owners. In addition, we shall also develop explanations for why governments behave as they do, imposing or reducing tariffs on some goods, but not on others. Finally, the course also identifies international policy-spillovers, meaning that one country’s trade policy may have consequences for economic welfare in other countries

Both the course and the exam will be in English.

Click here to enroll for the e-learning course.

Table of contents

Part I: Introduction

  • Chapter 1: The World Economy
  • Chapter 2: Global Economic Crisis

Part II: Comparative Advantage

  • Chapter 3: Classical Trade: Technology
  • Chapter 4: Production Structure
  • Chapter 5: Factor Prices
  • Chapter 6: Production Volume
  • Chapter 7: Factor Abundance
  • Chapter 8: Trade Policy

Part III: Competitive Advantage

  • Chapter 9: Imperfect Competition
  • Chapter 10: Intra-Industry Trade
  • Chapter 11: Strategic Trade Policy
  • Chapter 12: International Trade Organizations
  • Chapter 13: Economic Integration

Part IV: Trade Interactions

  • Chapter 14: Geographical Economics
  • Chapter 15: Multinationals
  • Chapter 16: Trade and Growth
  • Chapter 17: Heterogeneous Firms

Note

  • The course will take place weekly on Thursday, 8 – 10 a.m.
  • Detailed information can be found on the E-Learning server.

Recommended Literature

  • van Marrewijk, C. (2012): International Economics: Theory, Application, and Policy, 2nd Edition, Oxford University Press.

Additional Literature

  • Krugman, P. R. and M. Obstfeld (2009): International Economics: Theory and Policy, Pearson International Edition.
  • R. C. Feenstra and A. Taylor (2008): International Economics, Worth Publishers.
  • McLaren, J. (2013), International Trade, Wiley.

Exercise Course

An exercise course will support students in handling different modeling approaches. We will split up the exercise course in several groups in order to guarantee a close mentoring of students. It is strongly recommended to attend this exercise course in order to pass the exam.

Grading

There will be a 60 minutes exam at the end of the semester. Exam questions will be given in English, answers may be given in German or English.


Exercise

Übung, SWS:1, VL Number: 34021

Lecturer


Stefan Kornitzky
Philipp Meier

 Description

The exercise course is closely linked to the lecture and supports the students in handling different modelling approaches. The corresponding exercises will be provided on the elearning server of the University of Bayreuth. It might be useful to prepare the exercises in advance to the course. It is strongly recommended to attend this course as well as the lecture in order to pass the exam successfully.

The course will be held in English and will take place weekly. The exercise course will be split in two groups in order to guarantee a close mentoring of the students:

Group 1: Mon, 4 p.m. – 5 p.m., S 57

Group 2: Mon, 9 a.m. – 10 a.m.,  S 62

Click here to enroll for the e-learning course.

​Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen III - Offene VolkswirtschaftenHide

Vorlesung, SWS:3, VL Number: 34064

Lecturer

Michael Koch

Course description

Empirical evidence suggests that the exposure to trade is not too different from that observed at the beginning of the 20th century. However, the recent wave of globalization differs substantially from globalization a hundred years ago because it involves two new phenomena: the international fragmentation of production processes and the organization of firms across national borders.

It is the purpose of the lecture “Multinational Firms and Outsourcing” to shed light on these two phenomena. Aside from introducing workhorse models for analyzing these aspects, the lecture also offers empirical evidence for their predominance and the surge of foreign direct investment and international outsourcing in recent years.

Both the course and the exam will be in English.

Click here to entroll for the e-learning course.

Outline

Part I. Facts and figures

  • Overview and definitions
  • Case studies
  • Stylized Facts
  • Overview of existing literature

Part II. National versus international

  • Dunning's OLI framework
  • Horizontal and vertical MNEs
  • FDI in a three-country setting
  • Greenfield versus M&A

Part III. Firms and markets

  • Introducing the problem
  • Internal production versus outsourcing
  • Specific functional forms
  • Extensions

Recommended Textbooks

  • Barba Navaretti, Giorgio and Venables Anthony, J. (2004), Multinational Firms in the World Economy, Princeton University Press. (BV)
  • Markusen, James R. (2002), Multinational Firms and the Theory of International Trade, MIT Press. (M)
  • Brakman, S., Garretsen H. (2008), Foreign Direct Investment and the Multinational Enterprise, MIT Press. (BG)

Grading

Grading of the course is based on active participation and a written exam (1h). If the number of participating students is less than 5, an oral examination may replace the written one. (Students will be informed about the form of examination as soon as possible.)

Organization

Lect 2h, Mon 4-6 pm, S64, and Tue 4-6pm, S68. The course is blocked on 02.05.2017-30.05.2017.

Noteworthy: The language of the course is English.

​Makroökonomik IHide

Vorlesung, SWS:2+1, 

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger ; Michael Koch ; Matthias Kollenda ; Damir Krizanac ; 

Content

Hinweis: Diese Veranstaltung wird jetzt vom Lehrstuhl VWL E, Prof. Dr. David Stadelmann, organisiert.

Die Zielsetzung dieser Grundlagenveranstaltung besteht darin, zentrale gesamtwirtschaftliche Phänomene zu erklären. Ausgehend von der Kenntnis makroökonomischer Zusammenhänge sollen die Studierenden lernen, in gesamtwirtschaftlichen Zusammenhängen zu denken und sich mit wirtschaftspolitischen Empfehlungen kritisch auseinander zu setzen.

Lerninhalte

Die Veranstaltung ist als Grundlagenveranstaltung auf Bachelor-Ebene konzipiert. Im Zentrum der Veranstaltung stehen die Analyse des Zusammenhanges zwischen Output, Arbeitslosigkeit und Inflation in einer geschlossenen Volkswirtschaft sowie die Bestimmung wichtiger wirtschaftspolitischer Instrumente und ihrer Wirkung auf makroökonomische Größen.

Gliederung

  • Makroökonomik – eine Abgrenzung
  • Einige empirische Befunde ([B&I], Kap. 1 )
  • Wichtige makroökonomische Variablen ([B&I], Kap. 2
  • Der Gütermarkt ([B&I], Kap. 3)
  • Der Finanz-(Geld)markt ([B&I], Kap. 4)
  • Die Interaktion von Güter- und Finanzmärkten: IS-LM Analyse ([B&I], Kap. 5)
  • Der Arbeitsmarkt ([B&I], Kap. 6)
  • Interaktion von Arbeits-, Finanz- und Gütermärkten: Das AS-AD Modell ([B&I], Kap . 7)
  • Die Phillipskurve ([B&I], Kap. 8)
  • Inflation, Beschäftigung und Geldmengenwachstum ([B&I], Kap. 9)

Literatur

Aufbau und Inhalt der Vorlesung orientieren sich am Lehrbuch von Blanchard und Illing:
Blanchard, O. und Illing, G. (2006), Makroökonomie 4. Aktualisierte Auflage, Pearson Studium.

Hinweise zur Übung

Die Übungen sind eng mit der Vorlesung abgestimmt. Den Studierenden wird dringend empfohlen, sich sorgfältig auf Vorlesung und Übung vorzubereiten, damit sie den Ausführungen des jeweils Vortragenden folgen und Fragen zum Lehrveranstaltungsinhalt stellen können.
Für ein erfolgreiches Bestehen der Prüfung wird sowohl die Teilnahme an der Vorlesung als auch die Teilnahme an der Übung empfohlen.
Im Rahmen der Übung werden Aufgaben gerechnet. Die entsprechenden Aufgabenblätter werden im e-Learning Server der Universität Bayreuth bereitgestellt.
Die Übungen finden in 12 Übungsgruppen statt. Um einen Überblick über die möglichst gleichmäßige Verteilung der Teilnehmer auf die Übungsgruppen zu erhalten, tragen Sie sich bitte unter dem e-Learning-Kurs in die Übungsgruppe ein, die Sie besuchen möchten. Nähere Informationen entnehmen Sie bitte den Kurs-Seiten am e-Learning Server.

​Multinational Firms and Outsourcing (+ Exercise)Hide

Vorlesung, SWS:2+1, VL Number: 32118

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger

Content

Empirical evidence shows that recent trade figures – e.g. measured by the share of trade in manufactures relative to total production – are comparable with those at the beginning of the 20th century. However, the recent wave of globalization differs substantially from globalization a hundred years ago because it involves two new phenomena: the international fragmentation of production processes and the organization of firms across national borders.

It is the purpose of the lecture “Multinational Firms and Outsourcing” to shed light on these two phenomena. Aside from introducing workhorse models for analyzing these aspects, the lecture also offers empirical evidence for their predominance and the surge of foreign direct investment and international outsourcing in recent years.

Both the course and the exam will be in English.

Table of Contents

Part I: Facts and figures

  • Overview and definitions
  • Case studies
  • Stylized Facts
  • Overview of existing literature

Part II: National versus international

  • Dunning's OLI framework
  • Horizontal and vertical MNEs
  • FDI in a three-country setting
  • Greenfield versus M&A

Part III: Firms and markets

  • Introducing the problem
  • Internal production versus outsourcing
  • Specific functional forms
  • Extensions

Part IV: Labor market implications

  • Outsourcing and domestic labor

Supporting Material

Lecture Notes for this course can be downloaded from the E-Learning server.

Recommended Textbooks

  • Barba Navaretti, Giorgio and Venables Anthony, J. (2004), Multinational Firms in the World Economy, Princeton University Press.

Further Readings

  • Markusen, James R. (2002), Multinational Firms and the Theory of International Trade, MIT Press.
  • Brakman, S., Garretsen H. (2008), Foreign Direct Investment and the Multinational Enterprise, MIT Press.

Exercise Course

The exercise course is closely linked to the lecture and supports the students in handling the different modeling approaches. The corresponding exercises will be provided on the e-learning server of the University of Bayreuth. It might be useful to prepare the exercises in advance to the course. It is strongly recommended to attend this course as well as the lecture for passing the exam successfully.

The course will be in English and will take place weekly.

Grading

Grading of the course is based on active participation and a written exam (1h) at the end of the term. If the number of participating students is less than 5, an oral examination may replace the written one. (Students will be informed about the form of examination as soon as possible.)

Literature

  • Barba Navaretti, Giorgio and Venables Anthony, J. (2004), Multinational Firms in the World Economy, Princeton University Press. 

Further Readings

  • Markusen, James R. (2002), Multinational Firms and the Theory of International Trade, MIT Press.
  • Brakman, S., Garretsen H. (2008), Foreign Direct Investment and the Multinational Enterprise, MIT Press.
​Theorie und Empirie des internationalen Handels Hide

Vorlesung

Lecturer

Hans-Jörg Schmerer

Content 

Die Veranstaltung gliedert sich in zwei Teile – einer Vorlesung und einem Blockseminar – und richtet sich an Studierende in den Master-Studiengängen Economics, IWG und P&E die sich ganz allgemein für das Thema Globalisierung und im Speziellen für die Auswirkungen der Globalisierung auf verschiedene Arbeitsmarktgrößen wie Einkommen, Lohnungleichheit oder Arbeitslosigkeit interessieren.

Exercises

​Examensvorbereitung im Fach VWL für Lehramtsstudenten Hide

Übung, SWS:2

Lecturer

Daniel Etzel ; Matthias Kollenda ; Hartmut Egger ; 

Content

Die Veranstaltung richtet sich an Studierende des Lehramts an Gymnasien und Realschulen im Fach Wirtschaftswissenschaften und dient der gezielten Vorbereitung auf den volkswirtschaftlichen Teil des Staatsexamens. In der Veranstaltung werden ausgewählte Examensaufgaben aus der Vergangenheit besprochen.

gerneral information

Die Veranstaltung wird als Blockkurs durchgeführt.

​Repetitorium zur Makroökonomik IHide

Übung, SWS:2, VL Number: 33084

Content

Zur weiteren Vorbereitung auf die Klausur zur Makroökonomik I bietet der Lehrstuhl ein Repetitorum zum Ende des Semestern an. Die voraussichtlichen Termine sind:

Freitag, 27.07.2012, Audimax
Samstag, 28.07.2012, Audimax

Weitere Informationen entnehmen Sie dem ELearning Server.

Seminars

​Arbeitsmarktwirkungen der Globalisierung Hide

Lecturer

Daniel Etzel

Content

Die möglichen Arbeitsmarktkonsequenzen sind ein zentrales Thema der aktuellen Debatte über die voranschreitende Globalisierung. Kritiker weisen darauf hin, dass die Öffnung von Güter- und Kapitalmärkten, heimische Arbeitskräfte unter Druck bringt und die sozialen Sicherungssysteme gefährdet. Diesem Argument halten Befürworter entgegen, dass Globalisierung Wohlfahrtsgewinne mit sich bringt, die durch geeignete Umverteilungsmaßnahmen dazu genutzt werden können, alle Individuen besser zu stellen.

Ziel des Seminares ist es, auf Grundlage aktueller volkswirtschaftlicher Forschungsergebnisse die oben angesprochenen Aussagen zu diskutieren und kritisch zu hinterfragen. Außerdem soll die Rolle des Staates und seine Möglichkeiten zur Umverteilung angesprochen werden.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie hier.

Termine

Vorbesprechung: Dienstag 18. Oktober, 16-18 Uhr
Seminar: Freitag und Samstag, 18. und 19. November      

​Arbeitsmärkte in offenen ÖkonomienHide

Seminar, SWS:2, VL Number: 33025

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger

Content

Die Veranstaltung richtet sich in erster Linie an Studierende im Diplom-Studiengang VWL sowie Master- und fortgeschrittene Bachelor-Studierende in den Studiengängen Economics Internationale Wirtschaft und Entwicklung sowie Philosophy & Economics, die sich für das Thema Arbeitsmärkte in offenen Volkswirtschaften interessieren.

Vorkenntnisse aus dem Bereich „Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen“ und/oder „Arbeitsmarkt und Beschäftigung“ sind für die Teilnahme am Seminar sinnvoll – aber nicht Voraussetzung.

Teilnehmerzahl

  • Die Selektion der maximal 20 Seminarteilnehmer erfolgt nach folgenden Kriterien:
  • Besuch von Vorlesungen im Bereich „Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen“ bzw. „Arbeitsmarkt und Beschäftigung“
  • Bisherige Studienleistungen
  • Wichtig: Für Studierende aus dem Bereich P&E sind 10 (von 20) Plätzen reserviert.

Anforderungen

  • Aktive Seminarteilnahme
  • Präsentation (teilweise im 2er Team; ca.45 Minuten)
  • Diskussionsleitung im Anschluss an die eigene Präsentation (Diskussion ca. 30-45 Minuten)
  • Schriftliche Arbeit im Umfang von ca. 10 Seiten (am Ende des Semesters)
  • Economics Studierende erhalten hierfür einen Schein mit 5 Leistungspunkten, P&E-Studierende einen Schein mit 10 bzw. 8 Leistungspunkten (je nach Prüfungsordnung)
  • Die Anforderung, eine schriftliche Arbeit anzufertigen, entfällt für P&E-Studierende bei Erwerb eines „kleinen Scheins“ (2 Leistungspunkte)

Anmeldung und Abgabe

  • Anmeldung bis einschließlich 18. September 2009 (im Sekretariat VWL II, plus Abgabe einer Übersicht der bisherigen Studienleistungen und einer Liste mit drei Themenwünschen; heidi.frohnhoefer@uni-bayreuth.de)
  • Bekanntgabe der Teilnehmer und der zu bearbeitenden Themen bis zum 25. September 2009.
  • Späte Anmeldung: Solange es noch freie Plätze gibt, ist eine Anmeldung bis zum 20. Oktober 2009 möglich.
  • Abgabeschluss der schriftlichen Arbeit: Freitag, 31. Januar 2009. Die Folien zu den Vorträgen müssen eine Woche vor dem Veranstaltungstermin vorliegen.

Organisation

Das Seminar wird als Blockveranstaltung abgehalten (voraussichtlicher Termin 11./12. Dezember 2009). Zusätzlich gibt es am Semesterbeginn eine Einführungsveranstaltung (Dienstag, 27. Oktober 2009, 12-14h, Raum S42), in der noch einmal der Veranstaltungsinhalt besprochen und offene Fragen diskutiert werden.

Seminararbeiten und Vorträge können entweder auf Deutsch oder auf Englisch geschrieben bzw. gehalten werden. (Die Artikel liegen in der Regel in englischer Sprache vor.)

Seminarinhalt

Die möglichen Arbeitsmarktkonsequenzen sind ein zentrales Thema der aktuellen Debatte über die voranschreitende Globalisierung. Kritiker weisen darauf hin, dass die Öffnung von Güter- und Kapitalmärkten, heimische Arbeitskräfte unter Druck bringt und die sozialen Sicherungssysteme gefährdet. Diesem Argument halten Befürworter entgegen, dass Globalisierung Wohlfahrtsgewinne mit sich bringt, die durch geeignete Umverteilungsmaßnahmen dazu genutzt werden können, alle Individuen besser zu stellen.

Ziel des Seminares ist es, auf Grundlage aktueller volkswirtschaftlicher Forschungsergebnisse die oben angesprochenen Aussagen zu diskutieren und kritisch zu hinterfragen. Außerdem soll die Rolle des Staates und seine Möglichkeiten zur Umverteilung angesprochen werden.

Die zehn Seminarthemen im Überblick

Themenblock 1: Außenhandel und unvollkommene Arbeitsmärkte

  • Minimumlöhne in der traditionellen Handelstheorie 

Brecher, R.A. (1974), Minimum Wage Rates and the Pure Theory of International Trade, Quarterly Journal of Economics 88(1), 98-116.

  • Internationale Spillovers von Arbeitsmarktinstitutionen bei Minimumlöhnen 

Davis, D.R. (1998), Does European Unemployment Prop up American Wages? National Labor Markets and Global Trade, American Economic Review 88(3), 478-494.

Oslington, P. (2002), Factor Market Linkages in a Global Economy, Economics Letters 76, 85–93.

Meckl, J. (2006), Does European Unemployment Prop Up American Wages? National Labor Markets and Global Trade: Comment, American Economic Review 96(5), 1924-1930.

  • Effizienzlöhne und internationaler Handel 

Kreickemeier, U. and Nelson, D. (2006), Fair Wages, Unemployment and Technological Change in a Global Economy, Journal of International Economics 70, 451–469.

Matusz, S. (1996), International Trade, the Division of Labor, and Unemployment, International Economic Review 37(1), 71-84.

  • Die Rolle von gewerkschaftlicher Lohnsetzung bei internationalem Handel 

Naylor, R. (1998), International Trade and Economic Integration When Labour Markets are Generally Unionised, European Economic Review 42, 1251–1267.

Naylor, R. (1999), Union Wage Strategies and International Trade, Economic Journal 109, 102–125.

Bastos, P. and Kreickemeier, U. (2008), Unions, Competition and International Trade in General Equilibrium, GEP Research Paper 2008/28.

Themenblock 2: Internationales Outsourcing und unvollkommene Arbeitsmärkte

  • Gewerkschaften und internationales Outsourcing 

Skaksen, J.R. (2004), International Outsourcing when Labour Markets Are Unionized, Canadian Journal of Economics 37, 78–94.

Lommerud, K.E., Meland, F., and Straumen, O.R. (2009), Can Deunionization lead to International Outsourcing? Journal of International Economics 77(1), 109-119.

Egger, H., Egger, P. (2003), Outsourcing and Skill-Specific Employment in a Small Economy: Austria after the Fall of the Iron Curtain, Oxford Economic Papers 55, 625–643.

  • Effizienzlöhne und internationales Outsourcing 

Egger, H. and Kreickemeier, U. (2008), International Fragmentation: Boon or Bane for Domestic Employment? European Economic Review, 52(1), 116-132.

Mitra, D. and Ranjan, P. (2009), Search and Offshoring in the Presence of "Animal Spirits", unpublished Working Paper, Syracuse University: 

Themenblock 3: Multinationale Unternehmen und Gewerkschaften

  • Handelsliberalisierung und ausländische Direktinvestitionen 

Lommerud, K.E., Meland, F., and Sørgard, L. (2003), Unionised Oligopoly, Trade Liberalisation and Location Choice, Economic Journal 113, 782–800.

Collie, D. and Vandenbussche, H. (2006), Can Import Tariffs Deter Outward FDI, Open Economies Review 16, 341-362.

  • Gewerkschaften und international Mergers 

Lommerud, K.E., Straume, O.R., and Sørgard, L. (2006), National versus international Mergers in Unionized Oligopoly, Rand Journal of Economics 37(1), 212-233.

Themenblock 4: Umverteilungsmöglichkeiten in offenen Ökonomien

  • Ist es durch geeignete Umverteilungsmaßnahmen möglich, dass alle Individuen durch Handelsliberalisierung gewinnen? 

Brecher, R.A., Choudhri, E.U. (1994), Pareto Gains from Trade, Reconsidered: Compensating for Jobs Lost, Journal of International Economics 36, 223-238.

Davidson, C., Matusz, S. (2006), Trade Liberalization and Compensation, International Economic Review 47, 723-747.

  • Schafft Globalisierung Spielraum zur Reduzierung der Einkommensungleichheit? 

Egger, H. and Kreickemeier, U. (2008), Redistributing Gains from Globalisation, GEP Research Paper 2008/29.

Itskhoki, O. (2008), Optimal Redistribution in an Open Economy, unpublished manuscript, Harvard University.

​Arbeitsmarkt und Beschäftigung: Migration und StaatHide

Seminar

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger 

Content

Die Veranstaltung richtet sich an Studierende im Diplom-Studiengang VWL, an Master- und fortgeschrittene Bachelor-Studierende in den Studiengängen Economics und Philosophy & Economics und alle Zuhörer, die sich für das Thema Migration und Staat interessieren.
(Vorkenntnisse aus den Bereichen „Arbeitsmarkt und Beschäftigung“ und „Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen“ sind für die Teilnahme am Seminar sinnvoll.)


Teilnehmerzahl

  • Die Selektion der maximal 20 Seminarteilnehmer erfolgt nach folgenden Kriterien:
  • Besuch von Vorlesungen im Bereich „Arbeitsmarkt und Beschäftigung“ und/oder „Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen“
  • Bisherige Studienleistungen

Anforderungen

  • Aktive Seminarteilnahme
  • Präsentation (im 2er Team; ca. 45 Minuten)
  • Diskussionsleitung im Anschluss an die eigene Präsentation (Diskussion ca. 25 Minuten)
  • Schriftliche Arbeit im Umfang von ca. 10 Seiten
  • Economics-Studierende erhalten hierfür einen Schein mit 5 Leistungspunkten, P&E-Studierende einen Schein mit 10 Leistungspunkten
  • Die Anforderung, eine schriftliche Arbeit anzufertigen, entfällt für P&E-Studierende bei Erwerb eines „kleinen Scheins“ (2 Leistungspunkte)

Anmeldung und Abgabe

  • 02.-04. April 2008 (im Sekretariat VWL II, plus Abgabe einer Übersicht der bisherigen Studienleistungen).
  • Abgabeschluss der schriftlichen Arbeit: Freitag, 27. Juni 2008. Die Folien zu den Vorträgen müssen eine Woche vor dem Veranstaltungstermin vorliegen.

Organisation

Das Seminar wird als Blockveranstaltung abgehalten (voraussichtlicher Termin Ende Mai/Anfang Juni). Zusätzlich gibt es am Semesterbeginn eine Einführungsveranstaltung, in der auch die einzelnen Seminarthemen verteilt werden.

Wichtig: Für Studierende aus dem Bereich P&E sind 10 (von 20) Plätzen reserviert.

Die Arbeitssprache des Seminars ist Deutsch. Seminararbeiten und Vorträge können entweder auf Deutsch oder auf Englisch geschrieben bzw. gehalten werden.

Seminarinhalt

Im Rahmen dieses Seminars werden verschiedene Aspekte der Migration und hierbei insbesondere die unterschiedlichen Erfahrungen Europas und der Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika besprochen. Neben einer Betonung wichtiger Unterschiede zwischen diesen beiden Regionen steht das Phänomen des sogenannten „Brain Drain(s)“ (d. h. der Migration hochqualifizierter Arbeitskräfte) im Zentrum der Veranstaltung. Bei den einzelnen Vorträgen wird besonderer Wert auf einen Bezug zu aktuellen Entwicklungen sowie eine kritische Diskussion der Inhalte gelegt.

Die zehn Seminarthemen im Überblick

Part I: Managing Migration in the European Welfare State

  • Immigration and the EU (Boeri, Hanson & McCormick, 2002, ch. 1)
  • European Immigration Policy and Welfare State Provision (Boeri, Hanson & McCormick, 2002, ch. 2&3)
  • Eastern Europe and Attitudes (Boeri, Hanson & McCormick, 2002, ch. 4&5)

Part II: Immigration and the US Economy

  • Immigration Policy in the US and Adjustments to Immigration Inflows (Boeri, Hanson & McCormick, 2002, ch. 9&10)
  • Illegal Immigration (Boeri, Hanson & McCormick, 2002, ch. 11)
  • Fiscal Impacts and the Political Economy of Immigration Policy (Boeri, Hanson & McCormick, 2002, ch. 12&13)

Part III: Brain Drain, Brain Gain and Brain Waste

  • International Migration by Education Attainment, 1990–2000 (Özden & Schiff, 2006, ch. 5)
  • Brain Gain: Claims about Its Size and Impact on Welfare and Growth Are Greatly Exaggerated (Özden & Schiff, 2006, ch. 6)
  • Educated Migrants: Is There Brain Waste? (Özden & Schiff, 2006, ch. 7)
  • Brain Drain, Fiscal Competition, and Public Education Expenditure (Egger, Grossman & Falkinger, 2007)

Literatur

Den Themen 1-6 liegt folgendes Buch zugrunde

  • Boeri, T., G. Hanson and B. McCormick (2002), Immigration Policy and the Welfare System: A Report for the Fondazione Rodolfo Debenedetti, Oxford University Press.

Den Themen 7-9 liegt folgendes Buch zugrunde

  • Özden, Ç. and Schiff, M. (2006), International Migration, Remittances, and the Brain Drain, A copublication of the World Bank and Palgrave Macmillan.

Thema 10 basiert auf folgendem Artikel

  • Egger, H., Grossmann, V. and Falkinger, J. (2007), Brain Drain, Fiscal Competition, and Public Education Expenditure, University of Zurich, unpublished manuscript.

Hinweise

Die Themen 1-5 sind sehr gut für P&E Studierende (Bachelor) geeignet. Das Thema 10 ist formal relativ anspruchsvoll und sollte daher von Studierenden aus dem Diplomstudiengang VWL bzw. von Studierenden aus dem Masterstudiengang P&E behandelt werden.

​Brown Bag SeminarHide

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger 

Content

Dieses Seminar richtet sich an Studierende, die an aktuellen Entwicklungen in volkswirtschaftlicher Forschung interessiert sind. Studierende des Masterstudiengangs Economics, IWG und P&E können im Rahmen dieses Seminars Leistungspunkte im Modulbereich "Individueller Schwerpunkt" erwerben. Für Studierende des auslaufenden Diplomstudiengangs Volkswirtschaftslehre ist der Erwerb eines Scheins im Bereich Allgemeine Volkswirtschaftslehre möglich. Auch fortgeschrittene Studierende der Bachelorstudiengänge Economics, IWE und P&E können im Rahmen dieses Seminars Leistungspunkte erwerben. Für Details zur Anrechenbarkeit setzen Sie sich bitte mit dem Inhaber des Lehrstuhls VWLII in Verbindung.

Die zu erbringende Seminarleistung besteht neben dem Besuch der Veranstaltung aus einer Hausarbeit zu einer der behandelten aktuellen Fragen der Volkswirtschaftslehre sowie einer Kurzpräsentation im Rahmen eines gesondert durchgeführten Gesprächs über die Veranstaltungsinhalte.

Interessierte Studierende können sich per E-Mail an hartmut.egger@uni-bayreuth.de zum Seminar anmelden.

Das Seminar findet in einem Tagungshotel nahe Bayreuth statt.

China and the World EconomyHide

see here

​Corporate Governance Hide

Seminar, SWS:3

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger 

Content

Much of modern political economy, and the political economy of globalization in particular, focus on labor markets. This literature recognizes the fundamental importance of financial markets and corporate governance systems, but does so in an essentially ad hoc way. In this course, we try to build toward an analysis of globalization focused on financial markets and corporate governance. The course tackles two important issues. The first one is the firm and its relationship to financial markets. The second one is a comparative perspective on corporate governance that draws on research in comparative law, economics and politics. Also, some discussion on the effects of globalization will be offered in the course.

The course “Corporate Governance” consists of two parts. The first part will be a block seminar (scheduled for June 17/18: Friday June 17th, 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. S 22 (GEO) / Saturday June 18th, 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. S 121 (GWI)). The second part will be block lecture (scheduled for July 7/8). There will also be a meeting with interested students in the in the first week of the semester (scheduled for Tuesday, May 3rd 10-12, S 70 (NW II)).

For further information please follow the link.

​Development EconomicsHide

Seminar, VL Number: 33031

Lecturer

Damir Krizanac ; Daniel Etzel ; 

Content

Die  Veranstaltung  richtet  sich  an  Studierende  der  Diplom‐Studiengänge  BWL  &  VWL,  sowie  an  Master‐  &  fortgeschrittene  Bachelorstudierende  in  den  Studiengängen  Economics  und  Philosophy  &  Economics  sowie  Internationale  Wirtschaft  und  Entwicklung.  Vorkenntnisse aus der Entwicklungsökonomik, sowie gute Mathematik- und Englischkenntnisse sind für die Teilnahme am Seminar sinnvoll.

Teilnehmerzahl 

Zur  Auswahl  der  maximal  20  Seminarteilnehmer  dienen  als  Kriterien  die  Beschäftigung  mit  entwicklungsökonomischen Inhalten sowie die bisherigen Studienleistungen. 

Anforderungen 

  •  Aktive Seminarteilnahme 
  •  Schriftliche Arbeit im 2er Team  im Umfang von ca. 20 Seiten (am Ende des Semesters) 
  •  Präsentation im 2er Team (ca. 40 Minuten) 
  •  Diskussionsleitung im Anschluss an die eigene Präsentation (ca. 20 Minuten) 

Anmeldung und Abgabe 

Die  Anmeldung  erfolgt  im  Sekretariat  VWL  II  bei  Heidi  Frohnhöfer,  plus  Abgabe  einer  Übersicht  der  bisherigen  Studienleistungen  und  einer  Liste  mit  drei  Themenwünschen; heidi.frohnhoefer@uni‐bayreuth.de

Die  Folien  zu  den  Vorträgen müssen eine Woche vor dem Veranstaltungstermin vorliegen. 

Organisation 

Das  Seminar  wird  als  Blockveranstaltung  abgehalten  (voraussichtlicher  Termin:  Ende  November/Anfang  Dezember).  Zusätzlich  gibt  es  am  Semesterbeginn  eine  Einführungsveranstaltung (Termin/Raum  wird  noch  bekannt  gegeben),  in  der  noch  einmal  der  Veranstaltungsinhalt  besprochen und offene Fragen diskutiert werden. Seminararbeiten und Vorträge können entweder auf Deutsch oder auf Englisch geschrieben bzw. gehalten werden. (Die Artikel liegen in der Regel in englischer Sprache vor.) 

Hinweis 

Beachten Sie unbedingt die auf unserer Homepage veröffentlichten Hinweise zur Anfertigung wissenschaftlicher Arbeiten an unserem Lehrstuhl. 

Themenliste und Literatur 

Part I:  Child Labor and Schooling 

  • The Political Economy of Child Labor 

Edmonds, Eric V. and Pavcnik, Nina. “Child Labor in the Global Economy.” Journal of Economic Perspectives, 2005, 19(1), pp. 199‐220. 

Doepke, Matthias and Zilibotti, Fabrizio. “The Macroeconomics of Child Labor Regulation.” American Economic Review, 2005, 95(5), pp. 1492‐1524. 

  • 2. Who Profits by not Schooling the Poor? The Political Economy of Schooling 

Kochar, Anjini. “Schooling, Wages, and Profits: Negative pecuniary Externalities and their Consequences for Schooling Investments.” Journal of Development Economics, 2008, 86, pp. 76‐95. 

Part II  Health, Communicable Diseases and Development

  • 3. Lifetime Expectancy as a Key Variable of Economic Growth? 

Cervellati, Matteo and Sunde, Uwe. “Human Capital Formation, Life Expectancy, and the Process of  Development.” American Economic Review, 2005, 95(5), pp. 1653‐1672. 

  • 4. The AIDS Epidemic – A Humanitarian Disaster but not an Economic One? 

Young, Alwyn. “The Gift of the Dying: The Tragedy of AIDS and the Welfare of Future African Generations.” Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2005, 120(2), pp. 423‐466. 

Part III  Poverty, Inequality and Foreign Aid 

  • 5. Investigating the Influence of Colonial Background on Comparative Development 

Acemoglu, Daron; Johnson, Simon and Robinson, James A. “The Colonial Origins of Comparative  Development: An Empirical Investigation.” American Economic Review, 2001, 91(5), pp. 1369‐1401. 

  • 6. Can Former Slave Trade give an Explanation for Africa’s Underdevelopment? 

Nunn, Nathan. “The Long‐Term Effects of Africa’s Slave Trades.” Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2008, 123(1), pp. 139‐176. 

  • 7. Roads out of Poverty 

Richard, Pierre; Bayraktar, Nihal and El Aynaoui, Karim. “Roads out of Poverty? Assessing the Links  between Aid, Public Investment, Growth, and Poverty Reduction.” Journal of Development Economics, 2008, 86, pp. 277‐295. 

  • 8. Can Micro‐Credit bring Development? 

Ahlina, Christian and Jiang, Neville. “Can Micro‐Credit bring Development?” Journal of Development  Economics, 2008, 86(1), pp. 1‐21. 

Part IV  International Trade and Economic Integration 

  • 9. Does more Intellectual Property Rights Protection Spur Economic Growth? 

Parello, Carmelo Pierpaolo. “A North‐South Model of Intellectual Property Rights Protection and Skill  Accumulation.” Journal of Development Economics, 2008, 85, pp. 253‐281. 

  • 10. Investigating the Link between Wealth and Comparative Advantage 

Wynne, José. “Wealth as a Determinant of Comparative Advantage.” American Economic Review, 2005, 95(1), pp. 226‐254. 

​DiplomandenseminarHide

Seminar, SWS:2

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger ; Damir Krizanac ; Daniel Etzel ; 

Content

In der Veranstaltung werden durch die Lehrstuhlmitarbeiter die formalen Anforderungen einer Abschlussarbeit vermittelt und so eine Anleitung zu wissenschaftlichem Arbeiten gegeben. Darüber hinaus stellen die Studierenden ihren Themenbereich und ihre spezifische Fragestellung vor.

Ziel der Veranstaltung ist es, sowohl den Studierenden Fähigkeiten zu vermitteln, die es ihnen ermöglichen möglichst publikationsnahe wissenschaftliche Arbeiten zu verfassen, als auch den fachlichen Austausch unter den Studierenden und mit den Lehrstuhlmitarbeitern zu fördern.

Gerneral information

Im Rahmen der Veranstaltung besteht die Möglichhkeit, eine Prüfungsleistung für den Bereich „Individuelle Schwerpunktsetzung“ anzurechnen. Dies erfordert die Anfertigung einer Hausarbeit in einem ökonomisch relevanten Bereich. Für detaillierte Informationen zu den Anforderungen setzen Sie sich bitte mit den Lehrstuhlmitarbeitern in Verbindung.

​Does Globalization make unions dispensable?Hide

No further information currently available

​FDI, Trade and Economic PolicyHide

No further information currently available

​Firm-level Adjustments in a Globalized WorldHide

No further information currently available

​Financial Development and Economic GrowthHide

Seminar, VL Number: 03664

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger ; Damir Krizanac ; 

Content

Das Seminar ist an der Schnittstelle "Geld und Kredit" sowie "Finanzen und Banken" angesiedelt und richtet sich vornehmlich an Studenten der Diplom-Studiengänge BWL und VWL, sowie an Master- und fortgeschrittene Bachelor-Studierende in den Studiengängen Economics und Philosophy & Economics. (Vorkenntnisse aus den Bereichen "Geld und Kredit" und "Finanzen und Banken" sind für die Teilnahme am Seminar sinnvoll.)
Teilnehmerzahl

Die Selektion der maximal 10 Seminarteilnehmer erfolgt nach folgenden Kriterien:

  • Besuch von Vorlesungen im Bereich „Geld und Kredit“ und/oder „Finanzen und Banken“
  • Bisherige Studienleistungen

Anforderungen

  • Aktive Seminarteilnahme
  • Schriftliche Arbeit im Umfang von ca. 20 Seiten
  • Präsentation (ca. 30 Minuten)
  • Diskussionsleitung im Anschluss an die eigene Präsentation (ca. 30 Minuten)

Anmeldung und Abgabe

Die Anmeldung erfolgt bis 15.02.2008 bei Damir Krizanac (RW, Raum 2.59), plus Abgabe einer Übersicht der bisherigen Studienleistungen. Der Abgabeschluss der Seminararbeit ist am 16.05.2008. Die Folien zu den Vorträgen müssen eine Woche vor dem Veranstaltungstermin vorliegen.

Organisation

Zum Semesterende wird es eine Einführungsveranstaltung geben, in der die einzelnen Themen verteilt werden und eine Einführung in Endnote erfolgt. Das Seminar wird als externe Blockveranstaltung in den Alpen (Kaisergebirge) abgehalten. Der voraussichtliche Veranstaltungstermin ist der 29.05.2008 bis 01.06.2008.

Seminarinhalt

Im Rahmen des Seminars werden verschiedene Aspekte der Entwicklung des Finanzsektors und mögliche Wirkungen auf die Realwirtschaft besprochen. Neben den unterschiedlichen Entwicklungsprozessen bei Banken und Kapitalmärkten soll eine Betonung der Regulierungsmaßnahmen in diesen beiden Bereichen erfolgen. Die einzelnen Seminarthemen werden in den kommenden Tagen veröffentlicht.

Gerneral information

Blockveranstaltung nach bes. Ankündigung

​Firms in the Open Economy Hide

Seminar, SWS:2, VL Number: 34026

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger

Content

The seminar tackles the role of firms in the recent wave of globalization. Aside from studying firms in an international trade context, the seminar also offers insights into organizational aspects and labor market effects arising from firm-level adjustments in response to foreign competition. Since working on the different topics addressed in the seminar requires a good knowledge of microeconomic concepts and some knowledge of trade theory, the target group of students for whom the course is designed covers advanced bachelor and master students.

​Global Economy Hide

Seminar, SWS:2, VL Number: 33095

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger

Content

Im Rahmen dieses Seminars werden verschiedene Aspekte der Migration besprochen. Neben einer Betonung grundlegender ökonomischer Herausforderungen, die sich im Zusammenhang mit Immigration ergeben, stehen insbesondere die Probleme der illegalen Immigration und die Vor- und Nachteile von Entwicklungsländern im Zentrum der Veranstaltung. Bei den einzelnen Vorträgen wird besonderer Wert auf einen Bezug zu aktuellen Entwicklungen sowie eine kritische Diskussion der Inhalte gelegt. 

Knowledge-Level

  • Aktive Seminarteilnahme
  • Präsentation (einzeln oder im 2er Team)
  • Diskussionsleitung im Anschluss an die eigene Präsentation
  • Schriftliche Arbeit im Umfang von ca. 12-15 Seiten.
  • Economics Studierende erhalten hierfür einen Schein mit 5 Leistungspunkten, P&EStudierende können einen Schein mit 8 bzw. 10 Leistungspunkten (je nach Studienplan) erwerben. Dafür ist allerdings die zusätzliche Teilnahme an einem Abschlussgespräch zum Seminar erforderlich.
  • Die Anforderung, eine schriftliche Arbeit anzufertigen bzw. an einem Abschlussgespräch teilzunehmen, entfällt für P&E-Studierende bei Erwerb eines „kleines Scheins“ (2 Leistungspunkte)

Literature

  • Freeman, R. M. (2006). People Flows in Globalization, Journal of Economic Perspectives 20: 145–70.
  • Hanson, G. (2009). The Economic Consequences of the International Migration of Labor, Annual Review of Economics 1: 179-208.
  • Feenstra, R. C. und A. M. Taylor (2008). International Economics, Kap. 5 (Movement of Labor and Capital between Countries), Worth Publishers.
​Globalisierung und UngleichheitHide

Seminar, VL Number: 32117

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger

Content

Die Veranstaltung richtet sich an Studierende im Diplom-Studiengang VWL sowie Master- und fortgeschrittene Bachelor-Studierende in den Studiengängen Economics und Philosophy & Economics, die sich für das Thema Globalisierung und Ungleichheit interessieren. (Vorkenntnisse aus dem Bereich „Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen“ sind für die Teilnahme am Seminar sinnvoll.)

Teilnehmerzahl

Die Selektion der maximal 20 Seminarteilnehmer erfolgt nach folgenden Kriterien:

  • Besuch von Vorlesungen im Bereich „Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen“
  • Bisherige Studienleistungen

Wichtig: Für Studierende aus dem Bereich P&E sind 10 (von 20) Plätzen reserviert.

Anforderungen

  • Aktive Seminarteilnahme
  • Präsentation (teilweise im 2er Team; ca.30-40 Minuten)
  • Diskussionsleitung im Anschluss an die eigene Präsentation (Diskussion ca. 25 Minuten)
  • Schriftliche Arbeit im Umfang von ca. 10 Seiten

Economics Studierende erhalten hierfür einen Schein mit 5 Leistungspunkten, P&E-Studierende einen Schein mit 10 bzw. 8 Leistungspunkten (je nach Prüfungsordnung)

 Die Anforderung, eine schriftliche Arbeit anzufertigen, entfällt für P&E-Studierende bei Erwerb eines „kleinen Scheins“ (2 Leistungspunkte)

Anmeldung und Abgabe der Seminararbeit

Anmeldung bis einschließlich 13. Oktober 2008 (im Sekretariat VWL II, plus Abgabe einer Übersicht der bisherigen Studienleistungen; heidi.frohnhoefer@uni-bayreuth.de).

Da ursprünglich eine falsche E-Mail Adresse angegeben war, wurde die Anmeldung bis zum 13. Oktober verlängert. Diejenigen, die bereits eine E-Mail geschickt haben, werden gebeten, diese noch einmal an obenstehende E-Mail Adresse zu senden.

Abgabeschluss der schriftlichen Arbeit: Freitag, 23. Januar 2009. Die Folien zu den Vorträgen müssen eine Woche vor dem Veranstaltungstermin vorliegen.

Organisation

Das Seminar wird als Blockveranstaltung abgehalten (voraussichtlicher Termin 09./10. Januar 2009). Zusätzlich gibt es am Semesterbeginn eine Einführungsveranstaltung (voraussichtlicher Termin, Di. 21. Oktober 2008), in der auch die einzelnen Seminarthemen verteilt werden.

Seminararbeiten und Vorträge können entweder auf Deutsch oder auf Englisch geschrieben bzw. gehalten werden. (Die Artikel liegen in der Regel in englischer Sprache vor.)

Seminarinhalt

Globalisierungsgegner verweisen oft auf negative Verteilungswirkungen von stärkerer internationaler Integration. Globalisierungsbefürworter betonen andererseits die Existenz von Handelsgewinnen und argumentieren, dass bei geeigneten Umverteilungsmaßnahmen alle an diesen Gewinnen partizipieren können. Im Rahmen des Seminars sollen diese beiden Argumente auf der Grundlage von wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten kritisch hinterfragt und offen diskutiert werden. Dabei finden neben rein ökonomischen Beurteilungskriterien auch soziologische Aspekte Berücksichtigung.

Die zehn Seminarthmen im Überblick

Thema I: Entwicklung (und Offenheit), eine historische Perspektive

  •  Land, Institutionen und politisches Regime (2 Personen)

Adamopoulos, T. (2008), Land Inequality and the Transition to Modern Growth, Review of Economic Dynamics 11, 257–282.

Falkinger, J. and Grossmann, V. (2005), Institutions and Development: The Interaction between Trade Regime and Political System, Journal of Economic Growth 10, 231–272.

  •  Ursachen der unterschiedlichen Entwicklung Europas (2 Personen)

Pommeranz, Kenneth (2000), The Great Divergence. China, Europe and the Making of the Modern World Economy, Princeton. (Einleitung und Kapitel 1)

Thema II: Verteilungsgerechtigkeit in der philosophischen Theorie

  •   Egalitarismus und Suffizientarismus (2 Personen)

Cohen, Gerald (1989), On the Currency of Egalitarian Justice, Ethics 99, 906-944.

Parfit, Derek (2000): Gleichheit und Vorrangigkeit, in: Krebs, Angelika, Hrsg. (2000), Gleichheit und Gerechtigkeit, Frankfurt/M., 81-106

Thema III: Globalisierung und Entwicklungsländer

  • Globalisierung und Einkommensverteilung in Entwicklungsländern (2 Personen)

Goldberg, P.K. and Pavcnik, N. (2007), Distributional Effects of Globalization in Developing Countries, Journal of Economic Literature XLV, 39–82.

Chun Zhu, S. and Trefler, D. (2005), Trade and Inequality in Developing Countries: A General Equilibrium Analysis, Journal of International Economics 65, 21– 48.

  • Globalisierung und regionale Einkommensverteilung (2 Personen)

Zhang, X. and Zhang, K.H. (2003), How Does Globalisation Affect Regional Inequality within A Developing Country? Evidence from China, Journal of Development Studies 39, 47 – 67.

Venables, A.J. (2005), Spatial Disparities in Developing Countries: Cities, Regions, and International Trade, Journal of Economic Geography 5, 3-21.

  • Hunger (2 Personen)

Dreze, Jean and Sen, Amartya (1997), Hunger and Public Action, Princeton.

Singer, Peter (1972), Famine, Affluence, and Morality, Philosohpy and Public Affairs 1, 229-243.

Singer, Peter (2004), One World. The Ethics of Globalization, New Haven.

Thema IV: Outsourcing, Migration und Arbeitsmärkte

  • Internationales Outsourcing und Lohnverteilung (2 Personen)

Feenstra, R.C. and Hanson, G.H. (1999), The Impact of Outsourcing and High-Technology Capital on Wages: Estimates for the United States, 1979-1990, The Quarterly Journal of Economics 114, 907-940.*

Geishecker, I. and Görg, H. (2008) Winners and Losers: A Micro-Level Analysis of International Outsourcing and Wages, Canadian Journal of Economics 41, 243–270.

  • Weiterführende Literatur:

Feenstra, R.C. and Hanson, G.H. (2003), Global Production Sharing and Rising Inequality: A Survey of Trade and Wages, in: E.K. Choi and J. Harrigan, Handbook of International Trade, Blackwell Publishing.

  • Internationales Outsourcing und Beschäftigung (2 Personen)

Egger, H. and Egger, P. (2003), Outsourcing and Skill-Specific Employment in a Small Economy: Austria and the Fall of the Iron Curtain, Oxford Economic Papers 55, 625-643.* 

Egger, H. and Udo Kreickemeier (2008), International Fragmentation: Boon or Bane for Domestic Employment?, European Economic Review 52, 116–132.

  • Weiterführende Literatur:

Egger, H. and Egger, P. (2005), Labor Market effects of Outsourcing under Industrial Interdependence, International Review of Economics and Finance 14, 349–363.

  •  Migration (2 Personen)

Barry, Brian and Goodin, Robert, eds. (2002), Free Movement. Ethical Issues in the Transnational Migration of People and of Money, New York.

Carens, Joseph (2002), Migration and Morality: A liberal egalitarian perspective, in: Barry/Goodin, 25-47.

Steiner, Hillel (1992), Libertarianism and the transnational migration of people, in Barry/Goodin, 87-94.

Thema V: Neue Aspekte der Lohnverteilung

  • Handel und intra-Gruppen Lohnungleichheit (2 Personen)

Wälde, K. and Weiß, P. (2007), International Competition, Downsizing and Wage Inequality, Journal of International Economics 73, 396–406.

Egger, H. and Kreickemeier, U. (2008), Fairness, Trade, and Inequality, CESifo Working Paper No. 2344.*

  • Weiterführende Literatur (bzw. Alternative Modellansätze)

Egger, H. and Kreickemeier, U. (2007), Firm Heterogeneity and the Labour Market Effects of Trade Liberalisation, forthcoming, International Economic Review.

Davis, D.R. and Harrigan J. (2007), Good Jobs, Bad Jobs, and Trade Liberalization, NBER Working Paper 13139.

International EconomicsHide

Introduction: Thu 19th Oct, 10 a.m - 12 p.m S.46
Seminar: blocked on 24th/25th of Nov 8 a.m - 8 p.m,
S.44 and S.68

see here for more information

International Factor FlowsHide

No further information currently available

​International Organizations and TradeHide

Seminar, SWS:2, VL Number: 34027

Lecturer

Daniel Etzel 

Content

The seminar tackles the role of international organizations in the world trading system. The interwar period was characterized by high tariffs that led to a dramatic fall in world trade with large costs to the world economy. These costs were one reason for developing an agreement to keep tariffs low. In this seminar we will discuss issues of and recent developments in trade policy. Aside from studying the role of the WTO we will also discuss labor standards set by the ILO as well as non-governmental movements like Fair Trade.

Working on the topics of the seminar requires a good knowledge of microeconomic concepts. Furthermore, knowledge of trade theory would be an advantage.

Minimum Wages and EmploymentHide

see here

Modern Globalization: The great convergenceHide

Introduction: Fri 27th Oct, 2 p.m - 4 p.m,
Seminar: Mo, 18th Dec, 8 a.m - 8 p.m, and Tue, 19th Dec 8 a.m. - 8 p.m

​Research Seminar Hide

​Seminar, SWS:2, VL Number: 33308

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger ; Damir Krizanac ; Daniel Etzel ; 

Description

Im Rahmen der Veranstaltung besteht die Möglichhkeit, eine Prüfungsleistung für den Bereich „Individuelle Schwerpunktsetzung“ anzurechnen. Dies erfordert die Anfertigung einer Hausarbeit in einem ökonomisch relevanten Bereich. Für detaillierte Informationen zu den Anforderungen setzen Sie sich bitte mit den Lehrstuhlmitarbeitern in Verbindung.

​Tutoren-SeminarHide

Seminar

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger ; Damir Krizanac ; 

Content

Für die Veranstaltung arbeiten die Studierenden unter Anleitung des Lehrstuhls schriftliche Aufgaben und Musterlösungen sowie Präsentationen von vorgegebener Länge aus und tragen diese im Rahmen der einzelnen Tutorien vor. 

Gerneral information

Im Rahmen der Veranstaltung besteht für die Teilnehmer die Möglichkeit, eine Prüfung zu absolvieren. Diese Prüfungsleistung ist für die Veranstaltung „Schreiben und Präsentieren“ anrechenbar. Zusätzlich besteht die Möglichkeit, die Prüfungsleistung für den Bereich „Individuelle Schwerpunktsetzung“ anzurechnen. Dies erfordert die Anfertigung einer Hausarbeit in einem ökonomisch relevanten Bereich. Für detaillierte Informationen zu den Anforderungen setzen Sie sich bitte mit den Lehrstuhlmitarbeitern in Verbindung.

​The Organization of Production in an Open EconomyHide

Seminar, VL Number: 33069

Lecturer

Hartmut Egger 

Content

The seminar aims at shedding light on how recent forms of globalization have changed the nature of how production is organized in industrialized economies. Aside from opening up the black box of a firm, the seminar also offers novel insights into the labor market effects of openness arising from firm-level adjustments in the organization of production. Since working on the different topics addressed in the seminar requires a good knowledge of both microeconomic theory and international economics (in particular trade theory), the target group of students for whom the course is designed covers advanced bachelor and master students.

Topics in Trade PolicyHide

see here

​Trade and Global Sourcing: Multinational Firms, FDI and OutsourcingHide

No further information currently available
 

​Umweltökonomik und GlobalisierungHide

Seminar

Dozenten

Hartmut Egger 

Beschreibung

Die Veranstaltung richtet sich in erster Linie an Studierende im Diplom-Studiengang VWL sowie Master- und fortgeschrittene Bachelor-Studierende in den Studiengängen Economics und Philosophy & Economics, die sich für das Thema Umweltökonomik und Globalisierung interessieren. (Vorkenntnisse aus dem Bereich „Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen“ sind für die Teilnahme am Seminar sinnvoll.)

Teilnehmerzahl

  • Die Selektion der maximal 20 Seminarteilnehmer erfolgt nach folgenden Kriterien:
  • Besuch von Vorlesungen im Bereich „Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen“
  • Bisherige Studienleistungen

Wichtig: Für Studierende aus dem Bereich P&E sind 10 (von 20) Plätzen reserviert.

Anforderungen

  • Aktive Seminarteilnahme
  • Präsentation (teilweise im 2er bzw. 3er Team; ca.45 Minuten)
  • Diskussionsleitung im Anschluss an die eigene Präsentation (Diskussion ca. 25 Minuten)
  • Schriftliche Arbeit im Umfang von ca. 10 Seiten (am Ende des Semesters)
  • Economics Studierende erhalten hierfür einen Schein mit 5 Leistungspunkten, P&E-Studierende einen Schein mit 10 bzw. 8 Leistungspunkten (je nach Prüfungsordnung)
  • Die Anforderung, eine schriftliche Arbeit anzufertigen, entfällt für P&E-Studierende bei Erwerb eines „kleinen Scheins“ (2 Leistungspunkte)

Anmeldung und Abgabe

  • Anmeldung bis einschließlich 20. Februar 2009 (im Sekretariat VWL II, plus Abgabe einer Übersicht der bisherigen Studienleistungen und einer Liste mit drei Themenwünschen; heidi.frohnhoefer@uni-bayreuth.de)
  • Bekanntgabe der Teilnehmer und der zu bearbeitenden Themen bis zum 27. Februar 2009.
  • Späte Anmeldung: Solange es noch freie Plätze gibt, ist eine Anmeldung bis zum 20. April 2009 möglich.
  • Abgabeschluss der schriftlichen Arbeit: Freitag, 10. Juli 2009. Die Folien zu den Vorträgen müssen eine Woche vor dem Veranstaltungstermin vorliegen.

Organisation

Das Seminar wird als Blockveranstaltung abgehalten (Termin 05./06. Juni 2009, Zeit: tba, Raum S44). Zusätzlich gibt es am Semesterbeginn eine Einführungsveranstaltung (Dienstag, 21. April 2009, 12-14h, Raum S59), in der noch einmal der Veranstaltungsinhalt besprochen und offene Fragen diskutiert werden.

Seminararbeiten und Vorträge können entweder auf Deutsch oder auf Englisch geschrieben bzw. gehalten werden. (Die Artikel liegen in der Regel in englischer Sprache vor.)

Seminarinhalt

In einer offenen Ökonomie kommt der Umweltpolitik eine besondere Bedeutung zu. Kritiker weisen auf die möglichen Kosten von zu strengen Umweltauflagen im internationalen Wettbewerb hin. Befürworter einer aktiven Umweltpolitik argumentieren andererseits, dass in einem globalen Umfeld die Gefahr eines „race to the bottom“ bei Umweltstandards besteht und es daher wichtig sei, dass Industrienationen hohe Umweltstandards setzen, um in dieser Frage ein Vorbild für Entwicklungsländer zu sein. Um die negativen Wettbewerbseffekte abzumildern, wird in diesem Zusammenhang häufig auf die Vorteile internationaler Koordination verwiesen.

Ziel des Seminares ist es, auf Grundlage aktueller volkswirtschaftlicher Forschungsergebnisse die oben angesprochenen Aussagen zu diskutieren und kritisch zu hinterfragen.

Die acht Seminarthemen im Überblick

Thema 1: Außenhandel und Umwelt bei vollkommener Konkurrenz

  • Copeland, Brian R. und Taylor, Scott M. (2004): Trade, Growth and the Environment, Journal of Economic Literature 42, 7-71.

Thema 2: Außenhandel und Umwelt bei unvollkommener Konkurrenz

  • Tanguay, G. (2001), Strategic Environmental Policies under International Duopolistic Competition, International Tax and Public Finance 8, 793–811.
  • Straume, O.R. (2006): Product Market Integration and Environmental Policy Coordination in an International Duopoly, in: Environment and Resource Economics 34, 535-563.

Thema 3: Agglomeration und Umwelt

  • Calmette, Marie-Francoise und Pechoux, Isabelle (2007): Are Environmental Policies Counterproductive?, Economics Letters 95, 186-191.
  • Elbers, Chris und Withagen, Cees (2004): Environmental Policy, Population Dynamics and Agglomeration, Contributions to Economic Analysis & Policy 3, Article 3.
  • Neary, J. Peter (2006): International Trade and the Environment: Theoretical and Policy Linkages, Environment and Resource Economics 33; 95-118. (Nur die enstsprechenden Stellen zu Agglomerationseffekten!)

Thema 4: Multinationale Unternehmen und Umwelt

  • Markusen, J.R., Morey, E.R. und Olewiler, O. (1995), Competition in Regional Environmental Policies when Plant Locations Are Endogenous, Journal of Public Economics 56, 55-77.
  • Eerola, E. (2004), Environmental Tax Competition in the Presence of Multinational Firms, International Tax and Public Finance 11, 283–298.

Thema 5: Eine handelstheoretische Perspektive des Kyoto-Protokolls

  • Copeland, Brian R. und Taylor, Scott M. (2005): Free Trade and Global Warming: A Trade Theory View of the Kyoto Protocol, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management 49, 205-234.

Thema 6: Die 'Pollution Haven Hypothese' im Licht der empirischen Befunde

  • Javorcik, B.S. Wei, S.-J. (2004), Pollution Havens and Foreign Direct Investment: Dirty Secret or Popular Myth?, Contributions to Economic Analysis & Policy 3, Article 8.
  • Taylor, M.S. (2004), Unbundling the Pollution Haven Hypothesis, Advances in Economic Analysis & Policy 4, Article 8.
  • Frankel, Jeffrey A. und Rose, Andrew K. (2005): Is Trade Good or Bad for the Environment? Sorting out the Causality, The Review of Economics and Statistics 87, 85-91.

Thema 7: Umweltstandards und das Welthandelssystem

  • Bagwell, Kyle und Staiger, Robert W. (2002): The Economics of the World Trading System, 1. Auflage, Cambridge, 125-142 (Kap. 8).
  • Bagwell, Kyle und Staiger, Robert W. (2001): The WTO as a Mechanism for Securing Market Access Property Rights: Implications for Global Labour and Environmental Issues, Journal of Economic Perspectives 15, 69-88.
  • Kelly, Trish (2003): The WTO, the Environment and Health and Safety Standards, World Economy 26, 131-151.

Thema 8: Ökolabels und internationaler Handel

  • Melser, Daniel und Robertson, Peter E. (2005): Eco-Labelling and the Trade-Environment Debate, World Economy 28, 49- 62.
  • UNEP (2005): The Trade and environmental effects of Ecolabels: Assessment and Response, UNEP.
​Volkswirtschaftliches ForschungsseminarHide

see here.


Webmaster: Univ.Prof.Dr. Hartmut Egger

Facebook Twitter Youtube-Kanal Instagram Blog Contact